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Welcome to my digital home! There are lots of articles you might find helpful buried in this site on topics such as modifying an Alfa Romeo 159, rebuilding a Lotus 7 (Robin Hood 2B), not to mention a ton of stuff on technology in general. It’s all here somewhere, so use the search function or navigate using the menu structure. if you want to talk, reach out via the contact function, I usually do answer!

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LiveMixesJust messing around with some choonage, only 30 minutes or so long but some interesting choons and it doesn’t sound too bad https://jabawoki.com/wp-content/mp3/122009JabawokiMessinAround.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadRelated Images: [...]
LiveMixesOldschool Hard House from the archives https://jabawoki.com/wp-content/mp3/Jabs_050403_HardHouse.mp3 Podcast: Play in new window | Download Related Images: [...]
InfoSecOpen post to see coverage: computing.co.uk – April 2009 – Malware computing.co.uk – April 2009 – Risk in the recession pcauthority.com.au – April 2009 – Microsoft computing.co.uk – April 2009 – Microsoft crn.com.au – April 2009 – Risk in the recession whatpc.co.uk – April 2009 – Security computing.co.uk – April 2009 – Malware Searchsecurity.co.uk – April 2009 – Conficker & Patching Related Images: [...]
Alfa 159Once the planning was complete and I had the Amp prepared for some serious load, it was over to the car for a complete strip of the boot and sound proofing. The approach taken was to utilise a number of different sound proofing materials once I stripped the car back to the shell. To start with , a Bitumen material was used to create a panel deadening effect to eliminate rattles and vibrations. This was applied to all panels in as much quantity as was viable. The second stage was to utilise a 12mm thick high density foam to act as a sound proofing material. This was used to create a sound proof shell in the boot to stop the low frequencies going anywhere but into the cabin, as such, this material was not used on the parcel shelf, where the bitumen product was, but was utilised on every other surface that was externally facing. Where it was just not possible to utilise the thick 12mm foam, I made use of a 7mm medium density foam that was more pliable and easier to work with. ” order_by=”sortorder” order_direction=”ASC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″] Related Images: [...]
GeneralI can’t give these little devices enough praise! They are so easy to use and bring a new dimension to your sound. Ok, so most modern mixes have cuts and kills by default, but they are not a patch on one of these, not even on a Pioneer DJM600! These little gems use near analogue circuitry to give you a warm rich softer sound, rather than the cheaper mixer embedded kills you find these days. If you can find some of these, buy them,  they really are worth it. I had to get mine off ebay in the US, but despite coming with 110v power supplies and the hastle it took to find a suitable UK one to replace them, it was worth every penny. This is what you get for your money: “The Electrix EQ Killer ($299) is a Kill Box that lets DJs and producers EQ an element without investing in expensive equipment. Built like a tank, the unit comes encased in a rugged aluminium housing that will absorb a lot of abuse. With the included joiner plate, you can connect two Electrix Mods devices in a 19-inch rack. The EQ Killer can also rest on a flat surface. The front panel is tilted upward, making the controls easier to read. Kill the Band The front panel is divided into three sections: Low, Mid, and High. Each section has a Momentary switch, a Band Kill switch, and level control knobs. The level knobs dial up the amount of gain or attenuation for their respective frequency bands, offering up to 6 dB of gain per band. Unity gain is achieved when the level knob is set at 12 o’clock. Between the Low, Mid, and High level knobs are the Low X-Over and High X-Over sweep controls. The Low X-Over sets the point where the Low band ends and the Mid band starts. The High X-Over adjusts where the Mid band ends and the High band starts. The back panel has three input/output sections. Inputs 1 and 2 have standard RCA stereo connectors. There’s also a switch to select between line level and turntable input levels, and grounding posts for turntables. The third section’s Send/Return loop lets you apply external effects to the killed band. At the front of the unit’s bottom right-hand corner is an input selection switch for toggling between turntables or line-level devices. The button will act as a bypass switch if there’s only one device connected to EQ Killer”. Related Images: [...]
RH2B Build DiaryThe bonnet on the hoody is metal, in two sections, and was bolted together on a centre flange. This left a seam that was filled with filler and then a vinyl stripe laid over the top. Now this would have been fine except for the fact that the builder then installed a long pneumatic ram (the type that opens a boot on a hatchback) to hold up the bonnet when you lift it. Great for convenience but done in such a way as to cause a long term issue. Essentially, as the weight of the bonnet and nose cone were pivoting on an M8 bolt attached to the centre flange (2 x 1mm steel), the flange had twisted, bent and caused the bonnet to deform above. This in turn caused the filler to crack and separate from the bonnet, which then caused the vinyl to crack leaving an unsightly jagged line down the centre of the bonnet. Bonnet damage after removing the vinyl and cracked filler. Rather than just filling it and applying another vinyl sticker to it, knowing it would just do the same again, I set about designing and printing a better solution to the mounting of the jack point to the bonnet and also reinforcing the flange with several additional M8 bolts! A few iterations in Fusion 360 and 3 test prints in PLA, I had a final design that met the profile of the bonnet, bolted through the flange, spread the load of the bonnet more evenly and provided a solid anchor point for the jack. Design iterations The final design is pretty cool. It spreads the load exactly as I wanted and prevents the centre of the bonnet where the filler is being pushed up. It has also added rigidity to the panel as a side effect. Finished mount Once the mount was installed all that was left to do was fill the resulting gap with a flexible filler that wont crack and fall out, sand it smooth(sh) and the re-apply the vinyl. What I learned from this experience is something I was already pretty cognizant of. I cannot do bodywork!!! I dont have the patience for it at all! Finished article. Its by no means perfect but will do for now! Related Images: [...]
InfoSecOpen post to see coverage: Accountancy Age – August 2009 – Dark Pools of Talent Related Images: [...]
LiveMixesIn celebration of my birthday I thought I would take a trip back to my roots and put out a big room trance mix for you all. Enjoy! Track listing: 1     ALEX M.O.R.P.H. feat. Michael – Wanna Be (Album Extended Vocal Mix) 2     Cosmic Gate feat. Emma Hewitt – Not Enough Time (Extended Mix) 3     Dash Berlin feat. Emma Hewitt – Waiting (Original Mix) 4     Fabio XB & Andrea Mazza – Light To Lies (Gareth Emery Mix) 5     John OCallaghan feat. Audrey Gallaher – Big Sky (Markus Schulz AX Remix) 6     Rex Mundi feat. Susana – Nothing At All (Original Mix) 7     torcycle – As The Rush Comes (Daniel Kandi & Anton Firtich Divine Remix) 8     Myon & Shane 54 feat. Aruna – Helpless (Monster Mix) 9     Roger Shah & Tenishia feat. Lorilee – Im Not God (Roger Shah Mix) 10     Medina – You And I (Dash Berlin Mix) 11     Marco V – Unprepared (Extended Mix) https://jabawoki.com/wp-content/mp3/Jabawoki_Uplifting_Trance_Vibes_10022011.mp3 Podcast: Play in new window | Download Related Images: [...]
GeneralThe Problem: Ok, so anyone who has worked with sound equipment before would have been greatly disappointed shortly after taking the M-Audio Xponent out of the box. Essentially, it’s a bit crap. The main bug-bears are the faders, often referred to as being made by “Fisher Price”.They are loose, and generally feel nothing like a proper mixer, so anyone used to using pro audio equipment is going to feel short changed (I know I did!). That said, once you get over them, and there are some tricks you can apply to make them feel less annoying, the other primary bug-bear is Torq. This software can only be described as an epic fail! I gave it a shot, I persevered with it for a long time, and have come to the conclusion that its beat detection engine was programmed using chaos theory. I have mixed on many different platforms, decks (belt and DD), CDJ’s (from first gen to modern) and midi software from TraktorScratch V1.0 through to the usual suspects of today. What all of these platforms allow you to do is beat match with little effort if you’ve got a good ear. Torq on the other hand, seems to want to fight this process and in my own experience, creates a clinical/harsh environment to align beats without getting nasty overlay (beat on beat cancelation). If you persevere I am sure you can personally compensate for this and actually become good at “mixing with Torq” but IMO I don’t think it appropriate to change my mixing style after 20 years just to accommodate crap software. This problem brings us to the solution I have discovered. I don’t take credit for pulling this together, many people better than me have toiled long and hard to make this work and have done some excellent work on the subject. All I wanted to do was have a rant, show you how easy it is to make the Xponent better and then credit those who did the work. The Solution: Native Instruments have invested a lot of time and energy into refining the Traktor product to what it is today. I have used different iterations of it since Scratch v1.0 (the first ever version) and it just keeps  improving! The most recent version is Traktor Pro V1.x, I am using 1.2.4 and it is truly phenomenal. I won’t go into it in too much detail, but will say this much, its intuitive, just like it should be, has some amazing effects available out of the box and “just works perfectly”  What more could you ask for? Of course, Despite the Xponent being a Midi Control Surface and a Sound Card, it’s been locked into Torq to proliferate the spread of the evil program, but, there is a way you can break out of this and turn your midi control surface back into a programmable 2-way midi surface like any other. It’s actually quite simple: While you switch the device on, press and hold the number 2 Queue button + the Lock Button on the left deck. It’s that simple, hold them till it’s all booted up, and to check its worked, press any button, if it lights up then fades away, it’s not worked and you need to power off and try again. If it does not light up, you’re in business and you have a midi control surface ready to use with any Digital DJ software you want! At this stage you have a couple of options, start mapping the buttons yourself or grab a map that has already been put together. Personally, I like to short-cut things, so I would grab a predesigned map. After a good look around and a few failed starts, I found a mapping from HolyCT based on the work of DJ Kad listed in the NI Forums. It is amazing! It has all the mappings you would want, full documentation and even a browser mode so you can use the jog wheels to browse your track lists without the keyboard and mouse! It makes use of the X/Y Pad and is IMO a very well put together map for the Xponent. Bringing the good features from the Xponent to a well written and user friendly piece of software like Traktor Pro, is a marriage made in heaven! I am truly blown away with the usability and playability of the combination, and it has convinced me to stick with my Xponent for the time being. It may not be the best controller in its class, but it has some cool features and once you get used to the faders, it’s not all bad! Related Images: [...]
RH2B Build DiaryI had wanted a flat bottomed race wheel from the day I bought the car but other more pressing issues were ahead of the modification! The original wheel was a 280mm (small) 10″ old style wheel that was just difficult to use. It was also so far forward that your legs were right on it so it needed to be modified! That said, I bought myself a very reasonably priced 320mm flat bottomed suede OMP Racing wheel, a universal quick release boss, and a Momo steering wheel hub to fit the Sierra base. Once I had the parts, it was far more of a mamouth task than I originally thought! OMP Wheel on quick release boss. The first problem I had was getting the old hub off. I had to make a bar with a bolt in the center and bolt that to the hub then use the center bolt to push the wheel off the spline. Getting to that point took me the best part of 4 hours! Once it was off, the new Momo boss went on like butter, and then the back half of the universal boss mated straight to it. Up came the next problem though as the centre horm push was slightly too big to go into the universal boss so I had to modify it and sold the wires on the back of the horn push in order to get it all fitted. Ready to race! Once the wheel was installed I had to readjust the toe on the front end to line up the wheel and the wheels, but its going in for an MOT and a full alignment once its back on the road so I am not too worried! Related Images: [...]

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